Anal Probe "Test" Used to Determine if Men are Gay in Some Countries

It's still illegal for two men to have sex in many countries, and according to The Advocate, some even have a "test" to see if it's been happening.

As The Advocate reports, the legal systems in at least eight countries perform "anal tests" on men they suspect to have engaged in same-sex sexual relations to determine whether or not they have violated the country's anti-sodomy laws. These tests are not only invasive, but they are often forced upon people. In other words, that's sexual assault.

These tests have been performed in Cameroon, Egypt, Kenya, Lebanon, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, and Zambia on gay men and transgender women, where doctors probe their anuses with either a finger or an object in an attempt to determine whether or not they've engaged in anal sex — and if they have, they could be prosecuted, The Advocate reports. The United Nations condemns these tests as a form of torture, according to The Advocate, and it should be noted that these tests aren't medically accurate because there are many medical conditions that can lead to the same conditions within the anus as someone who has had anal sex. For more on the horrifying practice, be sure to read the full report from The Advocate.

While all countries should definitely ban this terrible practice, what also needs addressing is the root of the problem: homophobia. Having laws that prohibit someone from expressing their true identity is cruel, yet many places still have them on the books. Even in the United States,eight states still had anti-sodomy laws in place as of 2015, but a Supreme Court ruling from 2003 has ruled those laws unconstitutional and a violation of the 14th amendment because it bars consensual sex occurring between adults.

In other countries, though, these laws are alive and well. The real crime, though, is how much hate and misunderstanding these laws create. That's what should be outlawed, not love.

 

This article was originally featured on Teen Vogue

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